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Existentialist school of economics

New from LearnLiberty.org, a project of Institute for Humane Studies. I think there’s a reason why economics is called the “dismal science.”

The truths governing economic order are hidden from ordinary men. Glimpses have been given to far-sighted dynamos. Nicolaus Copernicus wrote on both heliocentrism and the debasement of currency; Theodor Seuss Geisel wrote on both feline haberdashery and imperfect knowledge in the egg and ham market. For the 21st Century, there is Art Carden and his groundbreaking work in the Existentialist School of Economics.

Speaking aloud the sacred and esoteric truths, Carden’s radical apathy draws on Sumerian scrolls left by ancient astronauts. He displays his mastery of Japanese Literati technique, which he learned during a family vacation to Hokkaido. Though most Westerners try and fail to grasp the principles of Nanga, Carden (already experienced in the Chinese Southern School) compassionately displays his arrogance in the core traditional arts of painting, calligraphy, and poetry.

Carden’s brief hiatus from iconography allowed Learn Liberty to capture this timeless, furtive wisdom, given for our benefit in haiku. Carden continues to strive after perfect personal equilibrium through rejecting abstractions of perfect knowledge and perfect competition.